Our Blog

Why “impact enterprises” outperform

by Rod Schwartz

Last week I had the pleasure and privilege of attending the annual social impact review of the HCT Group. HCT has been a client of ClearlySo for quite some time. In fact we met the company about a decade ago, so readers are welcome to take my comments with a pinch of salt.

This annual review has become a key date in the impact enterprise equivalent of the summer calendar. Dai Powell, the chief executive of HCT, discussed trends and how they are increasing the impact of their operations. HCT, as many readers already know, is a charity, but is also considered one of the UK’s largest impact enterprises.

The event was punctuated with glowing references to the various enterprises that provided products on the night. The venue was the St Luke’s Community Centre and the beer was Toast Ale. The highlight of the event was a funny video about someone with disabilities who had gone through independent transport training ans was now able to travel on buses and trains alone. Another video featured HCT chairman Sir Vince Cable, who was appointed leader of the Liberal Democrats on the very same day as the presentation. This video was not as funny, although I suppose that depends on one’s sense of humour.

What struck me during the meeting was the realisation that this company has been enjoying rapid growth at a time when the UK bus market has been in relative stagnation. I’m sure there are many factors behind HCT’s success, but I think there is one factor in particular we can’t ignore: values are “in”.

Observers who dwell on the limitations of enterprises with a social, environmental and/or ethical impact overlook the advantages of being an impactful organisation, especially these days. More and more, people want to work for organisations with values, people want to purchase from organisations with values, people want to invest in organisations with values and, luckily for HCT, local authority commissioners really want to purchase from organisations with values.

This point really was driven home (pun not intended) to me when one of the guests who presented at the event was a commissioner for the three boroughs of Kensington & Chelsea, Hammersmith & Fulham and Westminster. He spoke about how great HCT was and how excited they were about the contract they had recently signed. I suspect the Grenfell Tower disaster happened well after this contract was agreed, but now it’s hard to imagine any other outcome. Up and down the country commissioners are increasingly asking themselves questions such as “does this provider have the best interests of our community in mind, or its firm’s profitability and its personal bonus pool?”

For this reason, among others, HCT has grown at a compound rate of 12 per cent in revenues since 2009 in comparison with a relatively flat UK bus market. Other organisations we work with have seen similar growth and, in many cases, it is the social value provided that is winning the contracts. I believe there will be a lot more of this going forward as more and more commissioners and consumers get on board (sorry again).

This blog was originally published on Third Sector on 26 July 2017.